Saturday, April 4, 2009

Questions

Will answer you question

I am putting this out there for anybody who has any questions about Pianos, Music, Buying, Selling, Tuning and Servicing, Music Education, Playing and Listening to Piano Music. Let me know.

Please tell me what your question is and I will do my best to answer it. Bear in mind that it might take a little time for me to get back to you but if you are willing to be a little bit patient, I will get respond. If for some reason you don't hear from me please just remind me that you tried to contact me.

If you don't yet have a Google account, you will have to create one in order to register your question in a comment to this blog post.

Thanks, I look forward to talking to you.

Question

  1. Which piano has 4 strings per note? Steinway, Bechstein, Blüthner or Baldwin? The answer is Blüthner Pianos come with four strings per note rather than the standard three strings per note that you find on most pianos. The fourth string sits up higher than the other three which allows it to ring symphonically with the other three.

2 comments:

Nicky said...

Hello,
I am trying to find out about a player piano that I could be interested in purchasing.This is the info I got from the owner... Pratt Read Player action company
Pneumatic Player Action
Deep River Conn.
model:11
scale: 236
style: 72
serial: 63961
She says it plays in honky tonk and regular...

I am not very knowledgeable about pianos but I have always wanted a player piano. I am not familiar with this make of piano...is it any good? can you figure out what year it was made by the serial number and what does the scale number mean and also what does she mean by playing in honky tonk and regular?
If this is a decent make of player piano..will get someone with knowledge to check it out mechanically as she says they have not used the player part in 15 years, but used the piano itself in their livingroom for years.
Thank you for helping,
Monique
moretosee@hotmail.com

Piano Man said...

Hi Monique

The detail you are concerned about are secondary. Your primary concern should be simply to get a qualified "player man" out there to look at the piano. By player man I refer to a piano technician who also is experience at restoring old player piano mechanisms. He should also check the overall mechanical and structural condition of the actual piano, above and beyond the player mechanism.
I hope this helped..feel free to ask further questions.